Water use on Scilly 'significantly higher than UK'

November 6, 2018

Water consumption on the Isles of Scilly is significantly higher than the national average.

 

Using winter figures so as not to skew the figures with visitor numbers), Scilly's per head daily average (non metered) is 200 litres per day, while the national average (non metered) is 162 litres.

 

The figures are included in Senior Infrastructure Manager Craig Dryden's report on this summer's water shortage for November 8th's Full Council meeting.

 

The report includes steps being taken to avoid such a shortage occurring again, including a desire to meter all properties in the long-term. 

 

Planned measures also include continuing to identifying leaks and unmetered or unregistered connections and working to secure more operational resources on the islands to relieve the pressure on the existing small team and "allow more time for planned mitigations that can run alongside the day to day work of delivering a continuous water supply".

 

The operations team are also in the planning stage of a project to increase the amount of water that can be abstracted from the seawater intake, reducing the reliance on groundwater sources. 

 

Craig added: "The most important outcome we will seek is to achieve a permanent and meaningful reduction in how much water everyone on the islands use. Using winter consumption data (so it is not skewed by the influx of seasonal staff and visitors), we can see that the local consumption is significantly higher than the national average.

 

"In the long term, the hope is to meter all properties as this has been seen to achieve the best results in reducing consumption. While this is not economically viable at present and dependent on future investments once the water Industry Act and other legislation is applied to the islands, we will develop and implement a communications plan that will help everyone understand the fragility of our resources and empower them to help protect it."

 

St Mary's residents used up to 22% less water this summer than last. 

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